Critique of Hegel

Joan of Arc was, in her person and mission, the complete repudiation of Georg Friedrich Hegel

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel identified one of the most pernicious tools of the underworld in its efforts to lead whole civilizations away from the Kingdom of God on earth, the Holy Catholic Church. That tool is the manipulation of our superficialities by setting novelties before us, novelties that shine and glitter. We move toward these objects with the instinct of base animals. We are constantly told with every new moral depravity that “this is the way the world is going” and that we “need to get with the times.” Progressive new-thought is the moral superior to the “old, traditional ways.” History marches on, and those who help usher in each new age while wiping out the old is on the moral high ground. This is commonly referred to as the zeitgeist, or Hegel’s “spirit of the age” and “march of history.”

The Church, which holds the eternal, unchanging doctrinal and dogmatic treasures of the Kingdom of God, is not immune on the surface. In the aftermath of Vatican II’s mission to be more pastoral and less confrontational with the world, an overwhelming number of her subjects cried out that the “Church needs to get with the times.” Indeed they won the day, at least for the time being. What we have seen over the past five or so decades is the near collapse of the Church. It was a daring, yet highly successful strategy by the underworld to mitigate the Church’s influence in the world. Is there anyway to stop this mad march, this high speed chase down the wide road to Hades that Hegel has codified?

We can step back in time to the 15th century for an answer. Joan of Arc was in her person and her mission the complete repudiation of Hegel’s zeitgeist. The Hegelian (though this was well before Hegel’s time) “spirit,” which is nothing more than the Luciferian spirit of the world, was working in that era on destroying its mortal enemy, the Church, with the movement toward “collegiality.” This collegiality would essentially destroy the Papacy and move the Church toward a more democratic, revolutionary decision making body. Joan of Arc’s Armagnac army supported the Dauphin, Charles VII, whose coronation would put a stake into the heart of the collegiality movement. Most of Joan’s inquisitors were of the University of Paris, the center of revolutionary collegiality thought.

In addition to helping win the day for the Papacy against the zeitgeist of her enemies, Joan would also, unknowingly, unravel an even greater plan by the Luciferian forces to do away with France altogether, she being the Eldest Daughter of the Church. Not long after Joan’s time would come the evils of the Protestant Revolution, which, had Joan not saved France, would have encompassed all of the great Catholic Daughter, the Lily of Mary’s heart. Protestantism was then, and remains today, a perfect example of the Hegelian zeitgeist. The Catholic Church is old and out-dated. The novel doctrines of the revolutionaries are the moral superior to the traditional Catholic dogmas, and the latter must be wiped out to make way for the new. One cannot help but imagine that the hatred the world displayed for the Church and Catholic France a couple of centuries later in the French Revolution was but a pent up anger over Joan’s holy work.

Is there anyway to stop this mad march, this high speed chase down the wide road to Hades that Hegel has codified? We might reach out to St. Joan of Arc for help in finding that way, for the salvation of our own souls and those of our neighbors. 

Jehanne and shields

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